Adult Fiction · Writing

Review: Seven Men by Max Beerbohm

I’m picky about short stories. They have to be truly amazing for me to care at all. Where worldbuilding or a few interesting characters might get me through a novel, a short story has limited pages to make an impression. I have some I like, mostly science fiction (or scifi-inflected) with the occasional classic like…… Continue reading Review: Seven Men by Max Beerbohm

Comics · Sci-Fi

Three Comics by Tom Gauld

Serendipity, my friends. I happened to see Mooncop by Tom Gauld at work, it looked vaguely familiar and like something I would enjoy, and I had a spare half hour, so I read it. And it was great and I’ve now read the only other two I could find at the library and I love Tom Gauld…… Continue reading Three Comics by Tom Gauld

Adult Fiction · Queer

Classics Club: The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

The Classic: The Haunting of Hill House (1959) by Shirley Jackson First published in 1959, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House has been hailed as a perfect work of unnerving terror. It is the story of four seekers who arrive at a notoriously unfriendly pile called Hill House: Dr. Montague, an occult scholar looking for solid evidence…… Continue reading Classics Club: The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

Adult Fiction · Fantasy

Review: Paradise & Elsewhere by Kathy Page

I picked up Paradise & Elsewhere by Kathy Page several years ago as an advance reading copy, for no particular reason, and then it sat on my shelves for a long time. Even after I started reading it, I thought I might not get around to finishing, but something about it held me and I’m glad it…… Continue reading Review: Paradise & Elsewhere by Kathy Page

Adult Fiction · Comics · History · Nonfiction

Classics, Comics, and Continuity, or, How to Explain Books You Like

I was browsing through my local library’s online catalog recently, as I often do, and found two interesting books listed next to each other: How to Read and Why by Harold Bloom, and How to Read Superhero Comics and Why by Geoff Klock. “That’s gonna make an interesting blog post,” I thought to myself, so…… Continue reading Classics, Comics, and Continuity, or, How to Explain Books You Like

Adult Fiction · Sci-Fi

Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes (Classics Club)

I’ve decided to start a Classics Club list! You can read more about the challenge and see my list of titles here, but the short version is that I’ll be posting on a classic book about once a month. These probably won’t be reviews in my usual style, because that’s not so helpful with a…… Continue reading Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes (Classics Club)

Updates

Surprise! I’m a Book Blog

Hi everyone! It’s only been about eight months since my last blog revamp, but that time has helped me refine exactly what I wanted to do, so I’m making another tweak now. I’m becoming a book blog! I’m now titled “Hannah Reads Books” and I have a new theme, but you don’t have to refollow…… Continue reading Surprise! I’m a Book Blog

Children's & Middle Grade · History · Other Stuff

Museum Visit: Wren’s Nest (Atlanta, GA)

The Wren’s Nest is one of Atlanta’s historic attractions — the house of Joel Chandler Harris, author of the Uncle Remus stories! I visited over Christmas break and was very impressed indeed. (Apologies for the bad Kindle pics, it’s dark in there!) Wren’s Nest promotional materials emphasize that while Uncle Remus can be a racist symbol in…… Continue reading Museum Visit: Wren’s Nest (Atlanta, GA)

History

Novels & Human Rights Part 7: Historical Context (Social)

Last week we talked about 18th-century changes leading to Pamela’s impact, mostly in the book trade and in rising social classes. This week, we’re focusing on social changes, especially those that took place within all classes. For instance, religious books had traditionally made up more than half the number of total books published, but tastes…… Continue reading Novels & Human Rights Part 7: Historical Context (Social)

History

Novels & Human Rights Part 6: Historical Context (The Book Trade)

When I started this project, I had no idea what a radical century I’d be examining. The 1700s bore a host of social changes and crazy new thoughts coming out of the Enlightenment that started around 1650. One day I’ll read about it more comprehensively, but my year is 1740, and I’ll focus on factors…… Continue reading Novels & Human Rights Part 6: Historical Context (The Book Trade)