Nonfiction · Sci-Fi · Writing

Feminist Friday Review: How to Suppress Women’s Writing by Joanna Russ

Where in the heck did I hear about How to Suppress Women’s Writing by Joanna Russ? If you wrote a blog post about her in the past couple of months, do let me know. Anyway, Russ was an influential science fiction writer in the 1970s, so I’d been aware of her for a while and always meant…… Continue reading Feminist Friday Review: How to Suppress Women’s Writing by Joanna Russ

Adult Fiction

“What Did Miss Darrington See? An Anthology of Feminist Supernatural Fiction” — Is This Feminist?

Winner of a 1989 Lambda Literary Award, this collection of twenty-four entertaining and haunting 19th-and 20th-century tales from the US, Britain, and Latin America reclaims a literary tradition that has long been overlooked. Using such techniques as magic realism, allegory, and surrealism, the authors re-imagine the cliches of supernatural fiction, focusing on female characters and…… Continue reading “What Did Miss Darrington See? An Anthology of Feminist Supernatural Fiction” — Is This Feminist?

History · Nonfiction

Review – Children of Lucifer: The Origins of Modern Religious Satanism by Ruben van Luijk

I’ve been interested in Lucifer for a long time. I used to be a Christian, and even then I wanted to know how a few disparate references in the Bible had come to be understood as references to a single entity. How did we come to think of Satan the way we do? He’s a…… Continue reading Review – Children of Lucifer: The Origins of Modern Religious Satanism by Ruben van Luijk

History

Novels & Human Rights Part 3: Realism

We’ve already talked a bit about Samuel Richardson and how Pamela was a new species of realistic novel. As I mentioned last week, Richardson purposefully designed his book to be realistic, and called his method “writing to the moment.” Using the epistolary style, writing in the form of letters, he could allow his character to…… Continue reading Novels & Human Rights Part 3: Realism

History · Nonfiction

Resource Reviews: Pamela, Novels, and Human Rights

As you may be aware, I’ve just finished a research paper entitled “Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded: Novels and Human Rights.” It’s about how Pamela and other 18th-century novels laid a foundation for human rights legislation, via the mechanism of empathy. I’ll be posting content from that paper over the next few weeks/months, but first, here…… Continue reading Resource Reviews: Pamela, Novels, and Human Rights